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Scientists Untangle The 1%

New Scientist– AS PROTESTS against financial power sweep the world this week, science may have confirmed the protesters’ worst fears. An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.

The study’s assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable.

The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York’s Occupy Wall Street movement and protesters elsewhere (see photo). But the study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power. It combines the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world’s transnational corporations (TNCs).

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Afrika Bambaataa

“Hip-hop has been hijacked by a Luciferian conspiracy,” he says, quite matter-of-factly. “People have used hip-hop in a lot of ways that cause a lot of mind problems. They use the word wrongfully. They use it to mean a part instead of a whole. Like many of these [radio] stations say they’re hip-hop, they’re playing hip-hop. I go to these stations, and these so-called program directors don’t know jack crap about hip-hop culture. They know rap to a certain extent. But I question them. I say, ‘Where’s your go-go, your hip-house, your electro-funk, your raga, your R&B and soul?’ They get real quiet.”

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Ask About illuminati

The eye chart in the background reads “Ask About Illuminati.” It then changes throughout the scene. You use “ONE EYE” when reading eye charts. Episode is “Yuppy Ducks.”

Drone Hacked By University Of Texas At Austin Research Group

ImageWhen the U.S. Department of Homeland Security dared a Texas university research group to bring down a flying drone, the team accepted the challenge and did just that.

Turns out it’s not too difficult to hack a drone.

Nor too expensive, for that matter. RT reports that the University of Texas at Austin scientists, led by Professor Todd Humphreys, managed to bring down a flying drone with a spoofer costing just $1,000. The research group gained control of the University-owned drone by using a device to hack its GPS system, according to Scientific American.

Fox News explains how “spoofing” a drone’s GPS system works, as well as the advantages of this tactic over GPS-jammers: “While jammers can cause problems by muddling GPS signals, spoofers are a giant leap forward in technology; they can actually manipulate navigation computers with false information that looks real.”

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